The Checker Blog

Why It's Time to Begin Using Software to Audit and Inspect Your Assets

Posted by Shawn Macpherson on Tue, Jan 22, 2019 @ 07:40 AM

Audits and inspections can be done more efficiently and effectively with software designed specifically for that purpose.

Mobile technology has become almost synonymous with the 21st century. Digital and mobile technology have changed the business landscape virtually beyond recognition. Despite these trends, some companies are still operating with paper-based processes.

When it comes to asset audits and inspections, paper still makes sense in certain situations—such as when you are inspecting a remote facility or job site outside of any internet range. But most companies can benefit tremendously from audit/inspection software. 

Some companies are already using software for this purpose, but it’s essentially nothing more than e-forms unconnected to any system. Other organizations use ERP or other software that has an audit/inspection function but isn’t designed specifically for that purpose. These software “solutions” have some advantages over paper-based audit/inspection processes, but they don’t help users make the most of the information that’s being gathered.  

Where Should You Begin Implementing Audit/Inspection Software?

Safety in the workplace is an essential aspect for the well-being and smooth functioning of an organization. It's always advisable to make use of state-of-the-art technologies to help you achieve this task.

Audit/inspection software such as The Checker Software has numerous capabilities that far surpass paper-based audits and inspections. However, somewhat paradoxically, these many capabilities make it difficult to decide where to focus initial software implementation efforts.

The answer, however, is somewhat simple and straightforward. You should begin this implementation in the areas where audits and inspections will have the most significant impact on your costs and risk.

Regardless of what these areas are, audit/inspection software should be able to forward all results gathered to the appropriate personnel and notify them via alerts, emails, notifications, etc. The software should also be able to initiate corrective actions, report on progress, archive all data, and provide configurable dashboards for automatic reporting.

Scoring capabilities, allowing you to rate the severity of a problem or defect, can also be highly valuable.

Takeaway

Audit and inspection processes stand at the foundation of every comprehensive safety program. In addition to ensuring that you comply with regulations, these procedures will help you identify and correct problems before they can lead to accidents and costs. 

The Checker Software provides all of the above and more. It's a versatile tool that can be used remotely or in-office from any device connected to the internet. For more information, feel free to visit our website or contact us directly. 

Topics: mobile inspections, inspections and profitability, facility audits, audit software, audit/inspection software

How to Make a Comprehensive Safety Program Work

Posted by Shawn Macpherson on Fri, Jan 11, 2019 @ 01:30 PM

A comprehensive safety program with regular inspections can keep personnel safe and provide many ancillary benefits.

When talking about workplace safety, most businesses think they’re at least above average. But if they were to look at the details and how equipment operates in the field on a day-to-day basis, the reality may prove to be somewhat different

Most managers are aware that safety programs help minimize work-related injuries or sudden equipment failures, as well as the inherent costs that come attached to these issues. But some are still unaware of the short-term, bottom-line benefits of safety. 

Workers may be inclined to skip on safety procedures so they can finish their work faster. Some managers may turn a blind eye to this because it's easy to take safety for granted when accidents aren't happening.

If work-related accidents (even small ones) are a fairly common occurrence, or the equipment tends to break unexpectedly, you need a comprehensive safety program. 

Key Components of a Comprehensive Safety Program

Regular safety inspections and audits

The foundation of every safety program lies with regular inspections and audits. These forms of data collection help companies detect any problems before they can result in an accident or malfunction.

Inspection tools

Personnel need to be supplied with the resources to conduct audits and inspections accurately and efficiently. For example, The Checker Software allows safety inspectors to identify trends or problems that may require additional safety measures. 

Training

Regular safety audits and inspections will bring to light any unsafe activity by personnel. You can use this information for training purposes, focusing on areas that may need improvement. 

Additional Benefits of Safety

Maintenance

Analyzing audit and inspection data will reveal long-term patterns about the likelihood of when assets will break down. You can use this information to predict wear and develop preventive maintenance strategies to counteract the issues. 

Business Processes

Audits and inspections will also point to issues causing assets to fail prematurely. For example, if a piece of equipment breaks down every time within the next month after using it for a specific operation, it's safe to conclude that personnel might be using that equipment wrong when performing that function. There could, of course, be other causes of the problem but at least you were made aware of the correlation. 

Takeaway

There isn't a one-size-fits-all approach to a comprehensive safety program. Each company needs to develop its program based on its individual needs. But in every case, a tool such as The Checker Software can serve as the foundation for your safety program. For more information, contact us directly.

Topics: safety management, workplace safety, inspection software, equipment maintenance, safety audits, audit/inspection software

What You Didn't Know Inspection Software Could Do

Posted by Shawn Macpherson on Thu, Dec 27, 2018 @ 03:25 PM

Audit/inspection software can be used to get more out of audits and inspections, for less cost.

Regular workplace audits and inspections are essential for every business looking to prevent all sorts of work-related incidents, illnesses, property damage, injuries, or loss of revenue. Software can be a powerful tool in conducting these audits and inspections.

Some businesses opt to skip out on regular inspections, hoping to save on expenses. But as time has shown repeatedly, companies that do not take their safety seriously always draw the short straw.

Many other businesses that conduct regular audits and inspections do so in the traditional way—namely, on paper. And while there is nothing wrong with paper, it has some shortcomings, especially when compared to software. 

For starters, there's the storage cost of paper. Then there's the question of access to information. With a paper-based inspection system, users will physically have to find information. With modern inspection software, the data can be easily retrieved at any time.   

There's also the issue of standardization across numerous locations, which is much easier to achieve with software and leaves far less room for error than pen and paper. And don’t forget about transparency. Reports are commonly the first thing to be looked at when there is a proposal offering, collaboration opportunity, or contract to evaluate,. And these reports are much easier to generate and are more accurate with software.

Five Things Software Can Do That You May Not Be Aware Of

Let's take a look at some other, less-obvious features that audit/inspection software can provide. 

Auto-Populating

Auto-populating information so that you don't have to rewrite it yourself is a useful feature of software. It saves time and reduces errors in your process.

Reminders

This simple, yet incredibly useful feature is something paper-based systems will never be able to do. The automated reminder system will let your staff know when the next audit or inspection is scheduled, what other tasks remain for each, or other such similar issues, ensuring that nothing slips through the cracks. 

Point-Scoring Models

Audit and inspection software like The Checker allows users to assign scores to items, rather than simply passing or failing them.

Notifications

An entire year is a long time, and annual audits and inspections can easily escape your mind. But with software, you can schedule notifications.

Red-Flagging Compliance Items

You can design your audit/inspection software to red-flag compliance items that would block audits and inspections from being completed.

Takeaway

While these features may seem intuitive and straightforward, they are nevertheless crucial elements that will ensure the safety of your workplace and prevent anything from slipping through the cracks. With these features in place, there will be less room for error, more visible improvements, and fewer accidents overall. For more information on what audit and inspection software can achieve, visit our website or contact us directly.

Topics: inspection management, audit software, audit/inspection software

Five Ways to Make Your Workplace Safer

Posted by Shawn Macpherson on Thu, Dec 27, 2018 @ 08:30 AM

really good resuable with books with titles

Never undervalue workplace safety. A proactive approach to safety has many benefits and many risks and liabilities if you don't. A safety mindset can increase production, reduce costs, lower the risk of accidents, boost morale, and streamline operations. On the other side, however, if you decide to forsake workplace safety in favor of short-term profits, you may end up losing both.   

These five elements of a safe work environment are easily achievable by both big and small business.

Employee Training

Safety policies and procedures aren’t enough to ensure a safe workspace. The employer alone can’t guarantee workplace safety. Everyone in the organization should be trained in the importance of safety and their role in maintaining a safe workplace.

Nobody wants to get hurt or see their colleagues get hurt. But people generally have the impression that work-related accidents only happen in other places, to other people. This thinking leads to complacency, and that's precisely when accidents happen. Good training can  impart the safety attitude necessary to guard against this complacency.

Safety in Stages

Workplace safety almost always happens in stages. Usually employers originate the idea of protection. It’s what's known as the adoption stage. Once ownership and management have adopted a safety mindset, that mindset will spread throughout the company. but too often employees are acting safely simply because they’re instructed to.  what they're instructed to. This stage can’t go on indefinitely.

Next comes the engagement stage, when everyone genuinely buys in. It becomes part of the culture—let’s keep each other safe.

Available Resources

It costs money to implement and uphold safety. That’s the exact reason why some businesses decide to cut corners or renounce on safety altogether. Nevertheless, by doing so, all of these businesses—by not investing in safety—inevitably end up paying more in the long term than what they managed to save in the short term.

Smart organizations provide the resources to be safe.

Effective Response to Reported Hazards

Hazards in the workplace range from seemingly simple hazards (poor housekeeping, working in confined spaces, etc.) up to dangerous chemicals, exposed electrical wiring, and other such extremely dangerous (potentially fatal) issues.

Even if identified, most of these hazards go unfixed over prolonged periods, making them increasingly dangerous. That’s why you need audit/inspection software such as The Checker Software, which instantly emails action items to the people who need to be involved in remedying the hazard.

Leadership by Example

The workplace won’t be safe if the organization’s leaders “talk the talk but don’t walk the walk.”  It’s not wearing a hardhat while touring a site. It’s budgeting and effectively incentivizing. It’s truly valuing safety.

When leaders make it clear that safety matters immensely—and they back it up with action and budget funding—the cost-saving, life-saving benefits of investments in safety are fully realized.

Takeaway

Get on the right track of developing a safety-oriented culture where everyone stands to gain. For more information on how to increase the safety of your business, visit our website or contact us directly. 

Topics: safety management, safety awareness, workplace safety, safety audits, audit/inspection software

Streamlining Facility Management: A Case Study

Posted by Shawn Macpherson on Fri, Dec 21, 2018 @ 08:00 AM

fire extinguisher

As the vice president of facilities for Journey Health a large mental healthcare organization, John Pockey is responsible for 80 buildings. The Checker is helping keep them safe.

Many of Journey Health’s buildings are residential facilities housing people suffering from a variety of mental health issues. Pockey has a team of five inspectors, and one of these inspectors visits each facility once a month to conduct site audits, looking for any damage and upkeep needed. While there, they also check emergency equipment to make sure it’s working—a job that’s particularly challenging in Journey Health’s homes.

Fire extinguishers need to be checked monthly in any building, and a tag on each extinguisher is supposed to document each inspection. But some residents with behavior problems like to remove these tags, Pockey said, making it difficult to prove the inspections have occurred in order to comply  with regulations that require monthly inspections.

Also, to keep residents from panicking and helping them evacuate if needed after a loss of power, each residence has emergency lights in the hallways and stairways that will stay on with battery power for up to two hours. These lights also need to be checked monthly, and Pockey wanted a consistent process for inspecting them  and documenting those inspections.

That’s where The Checker Software comes in.

Journey Health is now using The Checker Software for its monthly inspections of the residences, as well as for the organization’s administrative facilities and outpatient clinics. The software, which is provided as software-as-a-service (SaaS), is well worth it’s minimal cost, Pockey said.

“It’s cut out a lot of steps in our process,” he said. “It saves a lot of time.”

The software can be used on any device connected to the internet, and Pockey said his inspectors use it on their smartphones. That capability was a selling point, he said.

“Everybody has a smartphone, so there was no extra equipment cost,” he said.

One feature of the software that Pockey greatly appreciates is its barcode reader. Barcodes can be put on each fire extinguisher and emergency light. By taking a picture of each barcode, the software immediately knows which specific piece of equipment is being inspected.

“I’ve looked for years for barcode software, and the price was just too high,” he said. “But The Checker wasn’t.”

Pockey also likes that work orders can be automatically generated and sent to maintenance when a deficiency is found. And he appreciates that all inspections and corrective actions are automatically archived and aggregated.

“Down the road, as we get into this, it’s going to provide us with a lot of data analytics,” he said.

Journey Health signed up for the software early in 2018, and The Checker provided training sessions until all of Journey Health’s users knew how to get the most out of it. Inspection forms also needed to be built.

“The form-building software is really easy to use, but with 80 buildings, we had to make 80 forms,” Pockey said.

During the process of learning the software and building the forms, The Checker always provided  prompt assistance, Pockey said.

“Their technical support staff is great at troubleshooting problems and fixing whatever needs to be fixed,” he said. ‘They are top-notch.”

The Checker Software is well liked within the organization, he said. Inspectors find that it makes their job easier, and the organization’s leaders like it because they can see reports as soon as they’re finished.

“I highly recommend The Checker Software,” Pockey said. “It’s been extremely valuable to our organization.”

Sharing the Cost of Service

Journey Health System is a nonprofit organization in Pennsylvania that acts as an umbrella organization for its member affiliates, all of which are nonprofits focused on mental health. Journey Health provides these organizations with management, administrative, advocacy, and facility support.

Journey Health’s board of directors is made up of representatives from each of its affiliates, which maintain their independence but benefit from the synergies of working together. Journey Health’s mission is to help these affiliates share costs and be able to focus on their core services.

The support Journey Health provides includes fiscal, human resources, compliance, information technology, clinical best-practice consultation, risk management, and bulk purchasing.

Topics: why inspect?, facility audits, audit software, audit/inspection software

Five Ways to Prolong the Value of Your Assets

Posted by Shawn Macpherson on Tue, Dec 18, 2018 @ 03:00 PM

image for prolonging assets blog

The so-called Age of Efficiency is upon us. For the past several decades, the consensus was to buy cheap, wear out, and buy again. But this model has proven to be inefficient. It also greatly strains the environment. 

A more sensible and logical approach to the issue is to prolong the life and, by extension, the value of your assets. This approach ensures you achieve the highest ROI possible, all the while keeping your carbon footprint at a minimum. It's a win-win situation for everyone involved. 

So, what are the five most natural things you can do to prolong the value of your assets? 

Doing Regular Maintenance

Taking the necessary time to create a scheduled preventative maintenance plan is an excellent way of preventing any minor issues from turning into large and expensive events.

You can even turn to a bit of predictive maintenance. By looking at the manufacturer's service records, you can predict when your equipment needs repair, based on the average lifespan of various components, the extent of their daily usage, etc.  

Employee Training

Your employees should be trained on the proper handling and maintenance of the tools and equipment they handle. It's important to remember that, since assets such as these are not employees’ personal property, they will frequently disregard their value, thinking it's not their problem if they break down. 

And while this is technically true, since you will be the one who will have to pay for repairs or replacements, your employees should nevertheless be trained on how to handle company assets correctly. Not only will this prolong an asset’s life, it will ensure the users' safety. Even seasoned workers may need refresher training from time to time.

Conducting Regular Inspections 

Regular inspections for compliance are not only mandatory but also a great way to keep your assets working better and longer. These inspections are specifically for identifying any potentially hazardous conditions, determining the root causes of those risks, and monitoring hazard controls. They also recommend corrective actions, take into account employee and supervisor concerns, and offer further understanding of safety standards. 

Keeping Clear Records

Recordkeeping transparency plays an equally crucial role in maintaining the value of your assets for a prolonged period. By knowing what inspections and maintenance have been performed, your staff can determine with a higher degree of accuracy when the next review is due. This ties in with the predictive maintenance mentioned above. 

Proper Housekeeping

Keeping the workspace clean and organized is yet another easy step you can take to protect the value of your assets. You should make a habit of cleaning the floor after work hours have ended and make sure that assets are safely stored away from the elements.

Takeaway

Prolonging the life and value of your assets should not be something hard to do. With a bit of care and mindfulness, it can be easily achieved. And by using The Checker, you will ensure that all of your inspections, audits, and maintenance plans are up-to-date and performed on a regular basis, leaving no stone unturned.

Topics: why inspect?, legal compliance, equipment maintenance, inspections and profitability

Tips for inspecting

Posted by Shawn Macpherson on Mon, Nov 26, 2018 @ 05:07 PM

 

fleet social media

Safety is the most important reason to Inspect your fleet vehicles. Safety for Employees, yourself and for other road users. An Inspection enables you to identify and report existing defects or potential hazards and can save you problems later on.

  • Compensation Claims

If your Employees are involved in a motor vehicle incident and injured while driving a vehicle for work duties, a compensation claim will have to be filed by the employer, as that is considered a workplace injury, whether they are using a Company Vehicle, or their own.

Accident prevention is a fundamental component in maintaining a safe and healthy workplace; contributing to increased worker morale and decreased worker injury and/or absenteeism.

  • Employer Safety Policies

Employer safety policies are a critical element in reducing motor vehicle incidents. Policies not only support and reinforce traffic laws and responsibilities, they also manage road risks through programs and policies to promote safe driving behaviors and ensure worker vehicles are safe and properly maintained.

  • Inspecting your vehicle

Worn, failed or incorrectly adjusted components can cause or contribute to accidents. Preventive maintenance and Inspection procedures help to prevent failures from occurring while the vehicle is being operated.

There are many causes of motor vehicle incidents such as road conditions, distractions, weather, speeding, driving skills and health, that can contribute to collisions and injuries. Keeping your vehicles safe is one less hazard to worry about.

  • Questions for Management

1. Are there excessive demands for the repairing of your vehicles? This should be viewed as an indicator of inadequate maintenance and Inspection procedures, and a vehicle maintenance situation which could cause or contribute to accidents.

2. Are there established inspection and reporting procedures for drivers?

3. Are drivers equipped with Inspection aids and the necessary report forms?

4. Are drivers encouraged not to drive when they discover a deficiency which should cause the vehicle to be placed out-of-service?

How many times have you seen a vehicle with any of these issues?

- Only one headlight working

- One or no brake lights

- Turn signal not working

- Low tire pressure

- Unsecured load in a pickup truck

- Out of fuel

These are just a few of the many unsafe conditions that would have been caught if a proper Inspection had been performed. It doesn't matter what type of vehicle you use, always inspect it. How else can you know whether there is sufficient window washer fluid for that snow storm you are about to encounter, or whether the lights, gauges, indicators, steering, horn, brakes and flashers are working properly?

For more information about The Checker, feel free to visit our website or email us at info@thechecker.net.

Topics: why inspect?, inspection software, vehicle safety, inspection forms

Why Inspect All Vehicles?

Posted by Shawn Macpherson on Mon, Nov 26, 2018 @ 09:59 AM

 

fleet social media

Safety is the most important reason to Inspect your fleet vehicles. Safety for Employees, yourself and for other road users. An Inspection enables you to identify and report existing defects or potential hazards and can save you problems later on.

  • Compensation Claims

If your Employees are involved in a motor vehicle incident and injured while driving a vehicle for work duties, a compensation claim will have to be filed by the employer, as that is considered a workplace injury, whether they are using a Company Vehicle, or their own.

Accident prevention is a fundamental component in maintaining a safe and healthy workplace; contributing to increased worker morale and decreased worker injury and/or absenteeism.

  • Employer Safety Policies

Employer safety policies are a critical element in reducing motor vehicle incidents. Policies not only support and reinforce traffic laws and responsibilities, they also manage road risks through programs and policies to promote safe driving behaviors and ensure worker vehicles are safe and properly maintained.

  • Inspecting your vehicle

Worn, failed or incorrectly adjusted components can cause or contribute to accidents. Preventive maintenance and Inspection procedures help to prevent failures from occurring while the vehicle is being operated.

There are many causes of motor vehicle incidents such as road conditions, distractions, weather, speeding, driving skills and health, that can contribute to collisions and injuries. Keeping your vehicles safe is one less hazard to worry about.

  • Questions for Management

1. Are there excessive demands for the repairing of your vehicles? This should be viewed as an indicator of inadequate maintenance and Inspection procedures, and a vehicle maintenance situation which could cause or contribute to accidents.

2. Are there established inspection and reporting procedures for drivers?

3. Are drivers equipped with Inspection aids and the necessary report forms?

4. Are drivers encouraged not to drive when they discover a deficiency which should cause the vehicle to be placed out-of-service?

How many times have you seen a vehicle with any of these issues?

- Only one headlight working

- One or no brake lights

- Turn signal not working

- Low tire pressure

- Unsecured load in a pickup truck

- Out of fuel

These are just a few of the many unsafe conditions that would have been caught if a proper Inspection had been performed. It doesn't matter what type of vehicle you use, always inspect it. How else can you know whether there is sufficient window washer fluid for that snow storm you are about to encounter, or whether the lights, gauges, indicators, steering, horn, brakes and flashers are working properly?

For more information about The Checker, feel free to visit our website or email us at info@thechecker.net.

Topics: why inspect?, inspection software, vehicle safety, inspection forms

5 Inspection Books You Didn't Know Existed

Posted by Shawn Macpherson on Mon, Nov 19, 2018 @ 10:24 AM

 

5 inspection books you didn't know

Inspection books are in high demand. Accurate and regular inspection of your equipment is critical in keeping your workplace safe, maintain compliance, and improve productivity. Most employees would agree that preventing these accidents should be a natural priority for any business. Safety irregularities are never intentional, but they do come about when companies try to cut corners and don't take the time to adequately train their staff on the importance of safety and safety protocols. 

And it's important to remember that, in the event of an accident, it's not only the employee who has to suffer and pay. According to the Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OHSA), "employers pay almost $1 billion per week for direct workers' compensation costs alone." Likewise, it's important to remember that the gap in coverage of an underinsured employer is still the responsibility of the employer and they will have to continue paying employees who miss work as a result of a workplace injury. 

It should also go without saying that proper inspections, or a lack thereof, can affect your business in other ways. For starters, fewer workplace accidents mean higher or steady productivity, whereas a single mishap can result in a steep drop in company-wide morale. Then there's the negative public perception in the event of one such accident, not to mention the legal liabilities that will follow.  

 

The New York Limo Crash

In early October 2018, a stretch limo carrying 17 people in upstate New York resulted in a deadly crash with all the passengers, driver, and two pedestrians killed. With a total death toll of 20, this incident is the deadliest US transportation accident since 2009 and made headlines around the nation. 

On closer examination of the crash site, it revealed that the driver never hit the brakes, plowing straight through a T-intersection. Also, the driver didn't have the appropriate license to drive that particular vehicle, while the limo failed an inspection only the month prior. 

The 5 Inspection Books

And while the investigation of the accident is still ongoing, with the authorities looking into all the activities and regulations of the limo-renting business, the takeaway could not be more apparent - proper and regular safety inspections are mandatory. To ensure that these inspections are done correctly, you will need the right inspection books. Below are five such inspection books that you may not know existed. 

Passenger Transportation Vehicles - It is for all applications, operations, and industries such as public transit, school, hospital, tourism, airport shuttle, limos, carriers, rentals, and all other enterprises that involve passenger transport.  

Railcar MoverThis inspection book applies to all mobile railcar movers, regardless of industry (construction, mining, forestry, industrial, warehousing, etc.) It also applies to all models, makes, manufacturers, sizes, etc.

Battery Charging Areas - Applies to the inspection and use of a battery and equipment such as charging, inspection, changing, maintenance, filling cells, production, models, sizes, voltage, etc. 

Wood Chippers - Available for inspection, operation, and use of all brush and wood chipper equipment in all industrial applications, regardless of make, manufacturer, size, brands, etc. 

Chainsaw - Applies to all chainsaw equipment in all industry applications such as firefighters, emergency responders, construction, forestry, landscaping, grounds keeping, etc. It also covers all areas such as the chain, saw bar, engine, controls, startup, PPE, and it applies to all brands, models, sizes, and fuel types.  

The Checker has been providing its Checklist Books since 2000, contributing to more over 20 million successful inspections. If you're interested in your company following the latest safety standards in your field and industry, or if you want to ask us for more details regarding our services, be sure to visit our official website, right here.

Topics: why inspect?, safety management, inspection checklists, workplace safety, inspections and profitability, inspection forms

5 steps to a well designed checklist

Posted by Shawn Macpherson on Mon, Nov 05, 2018 @ 09:09 AM

 

5 steps picture

No one wants to do extra work. You’ve probably seen it in your own workplace. Employees and Managers alike will always try to get the job done as quickly as possible. This is no different when it come to using The Checker Software for creating your custom Audit and Inspection forms.

Although having the flexibility to put whatever you want into your inspection form is an amazing feature, it can also be your greatest downfall. Here are 5 steps to follow when building out your inspection form:

  • 1. Add As Few Fields As Possible

This may sound counter-intuitive but research shows that the less fields you have on a form, the more likely a user is to complete the form. Inspections often require a lot of information to be gathered in order to remain compliant with specific regulations. Because of this, adding additional fields may make matters worse.

When considering adding new fields to a form ask yourself this question, “What will I use the data for?” If you can’t quickly answer which report this data will be used for or which governing body you will pass along this information to, take that field out of your form.

  • 2. Fields Should Be Organized Based On Your Process

If you’ve ever filled out information on a form only to go back and forth between pages in order to review notes or look at previously entered information, than you understand the value of this best-practice.

When planning out your Audit or Inspection form, make sure to consider each location and the method that is used by the Auditor/Inspector to complete the inspection. Consider things like, location, types of items being inspected, action items that may be gathered, team members working on the inspection, general notes that may be gathered.

  • 3. Make The Forms Easy To Fill Out

Some users may be using a phone, tablet or laptop in order to complete an inspection. Users will have varying skills when it comes to typing. As a best-practice, use as many auto-suggest and drop down fields as possible.

Other ways to make forms easy to fill out include having pre-populated fields, yes/no options, and multi-select fields. The Checker Software comes will all of the features built-in to make your life easier.

  • 4. Complete The Forms Yourself

It may go without saying but we have seen many times where someone builds a form inside their own box, only to find out it doesn’t work in the field. Make sure to complete inspections with your forms in order to ensure they don’t go awry.

  • 5. Don’t Do It Alone

Similar to number 4, many safety professionals end up in a scenario when an Audit or Inspection gets built in a bubble where no other departments have been consulted. This ends up in a pattern of iterative forms being created and the lack of being able to produce quality reporting.

Make sure to gather stakeholders from any departments who may need information from these Audits/Inspections. This may cause an initial delay in getting your inspection process started but will prevent future delays once the inspections begin.

Takeaway

Your inspection program is a huge key to the success or your business. Don’t take it for granted. Take the time to plan out your forms to make sure both workers and management get the most of out the data that is gathered.


If you think you may need help in planning out how to build your inspection checklist, we’re here for you! Contact us today to see what The Checker Software can do for you.

Topics: why inspect?, safety management, safety awareness, workplace safety, audit software