The Checker Blog

Playing "Russian Roulette" in the Workplace

Posted by Shawn Macpherson on Fri, Apr 05, 2019 @ 07:00 AM

 

Don't play "Russian Roulette" by optimistically hoping nothing awful happens because of unsafe workplace practices.

Russian Roulette is a lethal game of chance where a single round is placed in a revolver, the cylinder is spun, and the player sets the muzzle against his or her head and pulls the trigger. Without rotating the barrel of a six-chamber pistol after every pull, the average number of tries before the bullet discharges is 3.5

Based on these odds, why do some people still play this deadly game in the first place? In many cases, it’s because the players have a death wish. But for some daredevils, the reason is simply optimism bias

The Optimism Bias

This bias is merely one of the many cognitive biases most people experience on a day-to-day basis. These represent various errors in rational judgment, driven by a person’s subjective interpretation of reality. Humans naturally are drawn by the allure of a cohesive narrative of the events happening around them. We constantly simplify things, cherry-pick information, and in some cases, overestimate the success rate of our endeavours.

This optimism starts in childhood and follows us well into adulthood. In the Western world, children are taught from a very young age to have a positive outlook on life, which is generally a good thing but can also lead to optimism bias. 

It's because of this bias that we tend to discount the statistical likelihood of tragic accident or illness occurring to a loved one or ourselves. when a loved one is involved in an accident or diagnosed with a severe illness. The optimism bias is what makes smokers and gamblers disregard the statistics and keep with their vices. It's also why it’s so hard for people to change their behaviour when faced with a relatively slow-moving trend such as climate change. And it's why some play Russian Roulette. They skew or disregard the facts so they can maintain their personal and optimistic narrative about themselves. 

Not Doing Regular Audits and Inspections

When it comes to business settings, an equivalent of Russian Roulette (optimism bias) is not doing regular safety audits and inspections. In 2017, there were a total of 5,147 fatal work injuries recorded in the United States. That’s the equivalent of 3.5 deaths per 100,000 full-time employees and about 14 work-related fatalities per day. 

Some managers, executives, and even employees tend to disregard these numbers and gamble with their safety and the security of others on a day-to-day basis. This apparent shortsightedness is a clear example of overestimating one's odds and believing that bad things can only happen to others. But as like with Russian Roulette, it only takes one bad luck of the draw to bring that entire subjective optimism crashing down into demographic reality.   

The Checker Software is a cloud-based mobile audit and inspection software designed to optimize and streamline workplace safety procedures. It ensures that no safety procedures are skipped or forgotten and it generates reports, analyzes data, identifies hazards, and spots developing safety- or maintenance-related trends, significantly decreasing the risk of accident and workflow disruptions in the organization.

Takeaway

Russian Roulette is a terrible “game” with extreme risk—just as neglecting workplace safety is a unnecessarily dangerous path that can lead to tragedy and loss.

Topics: why inspect?, inspection software, audit software, audit/inspection software

Why Is Equipment an Asset, Not Just a Tool?

Posted by Shawn Macpherson on Wed, Mar 13, 2019 @ 12:01 PM

assets

In companies that use heavy equipment, personnel tend to view that equipment as nothing more than a tool to get the job done.

But it’s more than a tool. To correctly understand the value and importance of any piece of heavy equipment, you must consider it as an asset. It is a resource that has an economic value for the organization that owns it—a resource that should provide future benefits down the line.

Heavy equipment is a long-term asset—in both accounting and practical terms. It’s not only  essential to get the job done, it has financial value. The more you take care of these assets, the better they will serve, and the more value they will generate over the long-term. 

When people and organizations look at their equipment as simple tools, they are more likely to abuse that equipment, use if for tasks it wasn’t designed for, and not give it the proper care, attention, and maintenance it requires.

The result? Lower life expectancy of the equipment asset, loss of value, and equipment that’s not as efficient as it should be.

Audits and Inspections Maximize an Asset’s Value

To maximize your equipment's value and ensure productivity in the workplace, conduct regular audits and inspections. They will guarantee your assets are kept in tip-top shape, thereby protecting their value. And they help you to not get caught off-guard by malfunctions that can disrupt day-to-day operations.

Takeaway

Audits and inspections protect the value of pieces of heavy equipment, which are assets that are well worth protecting.

The Checker Software is the perfect tool for these audits and inspections.

 

For more information on the Checker software, please feel free to visit The Checker website or contact us directly at 905.825.0172 or info@thechecker.net. 

 

Topics: why inspect?, equipment maintenance, inspections and profitability

Streamlining Facility Management: A Case Study

Posted by Shawn Macpherson on Fri, Dec 21, 2018 @ 08:00 AM

fire extinguisher

As the vice president of facilities for Journey Health a large mental healthcare organization, John Pockey is responsible for 80 buildings. The Checker is helping keep them safe.

Many of Journey Health’s buildings are residential facilities housing people suffering from a variety of mental health issues. Pockey has a team of five inspectors, and one of these inspectors visits each facility once a month to conduct site audits, looking for any damage and upkeep needed. While there, they also check emergency equipment to make sure it’s working—a job that’s particularly challenging in Journey Health’s homes.

Fire extinguishers need to be checked monthly in any building, and a tag on each extinguisher is supposed to document each inspection. But some residents with behavior problems like to remove these tags, Pockey said, making it difficult to prove the inspections have occurred in order to comply  with regulations that require monthly inspections.

Also, to keep residents from panicking and helping them evacuate if needed after a loss of power, each residence has emergency lights in the hallways and stairways that will stay on with battery power for up to two hours. These lights also need to be checked monthly, and Pockey wanted a consistent process for inspecting them  and documenting those inspections.

That’s where The Checker Software comes in.

Journey Health is now using The Checker Software for its monthly inspections of the residences, as well as for the organization’s administrative facilities and outpatient clinics. The software, which is provided as software-as-a-service (SaaS), is well worth it’s minimal cost, Pockey said.

“It’s cut out a lot of steps in our process,” he said. “It saves a lot of time.”

The software can be used on any device connected to the internet, and Pockey said his inspectors use it on their smartphones. That capability was a selling point, he said.

“Everybody has a smartphone, so there was no extra equipment cost,” he said.

One feature of the software that Pockey greatly appreciates is its barcode reader. Barcodes can be put on each fire extinguisher and emergency light. By taking a picture of each barcode, the software immediately knows which specific piece of equipment is being inspected.

“I’ve looked for years for barcode software, and the price was just too high,” he said. “But The Checker wasn’t.”

Pockey also likes that work orders can be automatically generated and sent to maintenance when a deficiency is found. And he appreciates that all inspections and corrective actions are automatically archived and aggregated.

“Down the road, as we get into this, it’s going to provide us with a lot of data analytics,” he said.

Journey Health signed up for the software early in 2018, and The Checker provided training sessions until all of Journey Health’s users knew how to get the most out of it. Inspection forms also needed to be built.

“The form-building software is really easy to use, but with 80 buildings, we had to make 80 forms,” Pockey said.

During the process of learning the software and building the forms, The Checker always provided  prompt assistance, Pockey said.

“Their technical support staff is great at troubleshooting problems and fixing whatever needs to be fixed,” he said. ‘They are top-notch.”

The Checker Software is well liked within the organization, he said. Inspectors find that it makes their job easier, and the organization’s leaders like it because they can see reports as soon as they’re finished.

“I highly recommend The Checker Software,” Pockey said. “It’s been extremely valuable to our organization.”

Sharing the Cost of Service

Journey Health System is a nonprofit organization in Pennsylvania that acts as an umbrella organization for its member affiliates, all of which are nonprofits focused on mental health. Journey Health provides these organizations with management, administrative, advocacy, and facility support.

Journey Health’s board of directors is made up of representatives from each of its affiliates, which maintain their independence but benefit from the synergies of working together. Journey Health’s mission is to help these affiliates share costs and be able to focus on their core services.

The support Journey Health provides includes fiscal, human resources, compliance, information technology, clinical best-practice consultation, risk management, and bulk purchasing.

Topics: why inspect?, facility audits, audit software, audit/inspection software

Five Ways to Prolong the Value of Your Assets

Posted by Shawn Macpherson on Tue, Dec 18, 2018 @ 03:00 PM

image for prolonging assets blog

The so-called Age of Efficiency is upon us. For the past several decades, the consensus was to buy cheap, wear out, and buy again. But this model has proven to be inefficient. It also greatly strains the environment. 

A more sensible and logical approach to the issue is to prolong the life and, by extension, the value of your assets. This approach ensures you achieve the highest ROI possible, all the while keeping your carbon footprint at a minimum. It's a win-win situation for everyone involved. 

So, what are the five most natural things you can do to prolong the value of your assets? 

Doing Regular Maintenance

Taking the necessary time to create a scheduled preventative maintenance plan is an excellent way of preventing any minor issues from turning into large and expensive events.

You can even turn to a bit of predictive maintenance. By looking at the manufacturer's service records, you can predict when your equipment needs repair, based on the average lifespan of various components, the extent of their daily usage, etc.  

Employee Training

Your employees should be trained on the proper handling and maintenance of the tools and equipment they handle. It's important to remember that, since assets such as these are not employees’ personal property, they will frequently disregard their value, thinking it's not their problem if they break down. 

And while this is technically true, since you will be the one who will have to pay for repairs or replacements, your employees should nevertheless be trained on how to handle company assets correctly. Not only will this prolong an asset’s life, it will ensure the users' safety. Even seasoned workers may need refresher training from time to time.

Conducting Regular Inspections 

Regular inspections for compliance are not only mandatory but also a great way to keep your assets working better and longer. These inspections are specifically for identifying any potentially hazardous conditions, determining the root causes of those risks, and monitoring hazard controls. They also recommend corrective actions, take into account employee and supervisor concerns, and offer further understanding of safety standards. 

Keeping Clear Records

Recordkeeping transparency plays an equally crucial role in maintaining the value of your assets for a prolonged period. By knowing what inspections and maintenance have been performed, your staff can determine with a higher degree of accuracy when the next review is due. This ties in with the predictive maintenance mentioned above. 

Proper Housekeeping

Keeping the workspace clean and organized is yet another easy step you can take to protect the value of your assets. You should make a habit of cleaning the floor after work hours have ended and make sure that assets are safely stored away from the elements.

Takeaway

Prolonging the life and value of your assets should not be something hard to do. With a bit of care and mindfulness, it can be easily achieved. And by using The Checker, you will ensure that all of your inspections, audits, and maintenance plans are up-to-date and performed on a regular basis, leaving no stone unturned.

Topics: why inspect?, legal compliance, equipment maintenance, inspections and profitability

Tips for inspecting

Posted by Shawn Macpherson on Mon, Nov 26, 2018 @ 05:07 PM

 

fleet social media

Safety is the most important reason to Inspect your fleet vehicles. Safety for Employees, yourself and for other road users. An Inspection enables you to identify and report existing defects or potential hazards and can save you problems later on.

  • Compensation Claims

If your Employees are involved in a motor vehicle incident and injured while driving a vehicle for work duties, a compensation claim will have to be filed by the employer, as that is considered a workplace injury, whether they are using a Company Vehicle, or their own.

Accident prevention is a fundamental component in maintaining a safe and healthy workplace; contributing to increased worker morale and decreased worker injury and/or absenteeism.

  • Employer Safety Policies

Employer safety policies are a critical element in reducing motor vehicle incidents. Policies not only support and reinforce traffic laws and responsibilities, they also manage road risks through programs and policies to promote safe driving behaviors and ensure worker vehicles are safe and properly maintained.

  • Inspecting your vehicle

Worn, failed or incorrectly adjusted components can cause or contribute to accidents. Preventive maintenance and Inspection procedures help to prevent failures from occurring while the vehicle is being operated.

There are many causes of motor vehicle incidents such as road conditions, distractions, weather, speeding, driving skills and health, that can contribute to collisions and injuries. Keeping your vehicles safe is one less hazard to worry about.

  • Questions for Management

1. Are there excessive demands for the repairing of your vehicles? This should be viewed as an indicator of inadequate maintenance and Inspection procedures, and a vehicle maintenance situation which could cause or contribute to accidents.

2. Are there established inspection and reporting procedures for drivers?

3. Are drivers equipped with Inspection aids and the necessary report forms?

4. Are drivers encouraged not to drive when they discover a deficiency which should cause the vehicle to be placed out-of-service?

How many times have you seen a vehicle with any of these issues?

- Only one headlight working

- One or no brake lights

- Turn signal not working

- Low tire pressure

- Unsecured load in a pickup truck

- Out of fuel

These are just a few of the many unsafe conditions that would have been caught if a proper Inspection had been performed. It doesn't matter what type of vehicle you use, always inspect it. How else can you know whether there is sufficient window washer fluid for that snow storm you are about to encounter, or whether the lights, gauges, indicators, steering, horn, brakes and flashers are working properly?

For more information about The Checker, feel free to visit our website or email us at info@thechecker.net.

Topics: why inspect?, inspection software, vehicle safety, inspection forms

Why Inspect All Vehicles?

Posted by Shawn Macpherson on Mon, Nov 26, 2018 @ 09:59 AM

 

fleet social media

Safety is the most important reason to Inspect your fleet vehicles. Safety for Employees, yourself and for other road users. An Inspection enables you to identify and report existing defects or potential hazards and can save you problems later on.

  • Compensation Claims

If your Employees are involved in a motor vehicle incident and injured while driving a vehicle for work duties, a compensation claim will have to be filed by the employer, as that is considered a workplace injury, whether they are using a Company Vehicle, or their own.

Accident prevention is a fundamental component in maintaining a safe and healthy workplace; contributing to increased worker morale and decreased worker injury and/or absenteeism.

  • Employer Safety Policies

Employer safety policies are a critical element in reducing motor vehicle incidents. Policies not only support and reinforce traffic laws and responsibilities, they also manage road risks through programs and policies to promote safe driving behaviors and ensure worker vehicles are safe and properly maintained.

  • Inspecting your vehicle

Worn, failed or incorrectly adjusted components can cause or contribute to accidents. Preventive maintenance and Inspection procedures help to prevent failures from occurring while the vehicle is being operated.

There are many causes of motor vehicle incidents such as road conditions, distractions, weather, speeding, driving skills and health, that can contribute to collisions and injuries. Keeping your vehicles safe is one less hazard to worry about.

  • Questions for Management

1. Are there excessive demands for the repairing of your vehicles? This should be viewed as an indicator of inadequate maintenance and Inspection procedures, and a vehicle maintenance situation which could cause or contribute to accidents.

2. Are there established inspection and reporting procedures for drivers?

3. Are drivers equipped with Inspection aids and the necessary report forms?

4. Are drivers encouraged not to drive when they discover a deficiency which should cause the vehicle to be placed out-of-service?

How many times have you seen a vehicle with any of these issues?

- Only one headlight working

- One or no brake lights

- Turn signal not working

- Low tire pressure

- Unsecured load in a pickup truck

- Out of fuel

These are just a few of the many unsafe conditions that would have been caught if a proper Inspection had been performed. It doesn't matter what type of vehicle you use, always inspect it. How else can you know whether there is sufficient window washer fluid for that snow storm you are about to encounter, or whether the lights, gauges, indicators, steering, horn, brakes and flashers are working properly?

For more information about The Checker, feel free to visit our website or email us at info@thechecker.net.

Topics: why inspect?, inspection software, vehicle safety, inspection forms

5 Inspection Books You Didn't Know Existed

Posted by Shawn Macpherson on Mon, Nov 19, 2018 @ 10:24 AM

 

5 inspection books you didn't know

Inspection books are in high demand. Accurate and regular inspection of your equipment is critical in keeping your workplace safe, maintain compliance, and improve productivity. Most employees would agree that preventing these accidents should be a natural priority for any business. Safety irregularities are never intentional, but they do come about when companies try to cut corners and don't take the time to adequately train their staff on the importance of safety and safety protocols. 

And it's important to remember that, in the event of an accident, it's not only the employee who has to suffer and pay. According to the Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OHSA), "employers pay almost $1 billion per week for direct workers' compensation costs alone." Likewise, it's important to remember that the gap in coverage of an underinsured employer is still the responsibility of the employer and they will have to continue paying employees who miss work as a result of a workplace injury. 

It should also go without saying that proper inspections, or a lack thereof, can affect your business in other ways. For starters, fewer workplace accidents mean higher or steady productivity, whereas a single mishap can result in a steep drop in company-wide morale. Then there's the negative public perception in the event of one such accident, not to mention the legal liabilities that will follow.  

 

The New York Limo Crash

In early October 2018, a stretch limo carrying 17 people in upstate New York resulted in a deadly crash with all the passengers, driver, and two pedestrians killed. With a total death toll of 20, this incident is the deadliest US transportation accident since 2009 and made headlines around the nation. 

On closer examination of the crash site, it revealed that the driver never hit the brakes, plowing straight through a T-intersection. Also, the driver didn't have the appropriate license to drive that particular vehicle, while the limo failed an inspection only the month prior. 

The 5 Inspection Books

And while the investigation of the accident is still ongoing, with the authorities looking into all the activities and regulations of the limo-renting business, the takeaway could not be more apparent - proper and regular safety inspections are mandatory. To ensure that these inspections are done correctly, you will need the right inspection books. Below are five such inspection books that you may not know existed. 

Passenger Transportation Vehicles - It is for all applications, operations, and industries such as public transit, school, hospital, tourism, airport shuttle, limos, carriers, rentals, and all other enterprises that involve passenger transport.  

Railcar MoverThis inspection book applies to all mobile railcar movers, regardless of industry (construction, mining, forestry, industrial, warehousing, etc.) It also applies to all models, makes, manufacturers, sizes, etc.

Battery Charging Areas - Applies to the inspection and use of a battery and equipment such as charging, inspection, changing, maintenance, filling cells, production, models, sizes, voltage, etc. 

Wood Chippers - Available for inspection, operation, and use of all brush and wood chipper equipment in all industrial applications, regardless of make, manufacturer, size, brands, etc. 

Chainsaw - Applies to all chainsaw equipment in all industry applications such as firefighters, emergency responders, construction, forestry, landscaping, grounds keeping, etc. It also covers all areas such as the chain, saw bar, engine, controls, startup, PPE, and it applies to all brands, models, sizes, and fuel types.  

The Checker has been providing its Checklist Books since 2000, contributing to more over 20 million successful inspections. If you're interested in your company following the latest safety standards in your field and industry, or if you want to ask us for more details regarding our services, be sure to visit our official website, right here.

Topics: why inspect?, safety management, inspection checklists, workplace safety, inspections and profitability, inspection forms

5 steps to a well designed checklist

Posted by Shawn Macpherson on Mon, Nov 05, 2018 @ 09:09 AM

 

5 steps picture

No one wants to do extra work. You’ve probably seen it in your own workplace. Employees and Managers alike will always try to get the job done as quickly as possible. This is no different when it come to using The Checker Software for creating your custom Audit and Inspection forms.

Although having the flexibility to put whatever you want into your inspection form is an amazing feature, it can also be your greatest downfall. Here are 5 steps to follow when building out your inspection form:

  • 1. Add As Few Fields As Possible

This may sound counter-intuitive but research shows that the less fields you have on a form, the more likely a user is to complete the form. Inspections often require a lot of information to be gathered in order to remain compliant with specific regulations. Because of this, adding additional fields may make matters worse.

When considering adding new fields to a form ask yourself this question, “What will I use the data for?” If you can’t quickly answer which report this data will be used for or which governing body you will pass along this information to, take that field out of your form.

  • 2. Fields Should Be Organized Based On Your Process

If you’ve ever filled out information on a form only to go back and forth between pages in order to review notes or look at previously entered information, than you understand the value of this best-practice.

When planning out your Audit or Inspection form, make sure to consider each location and the method that is used by the Auditor/Inspector to complete the inspection. Consider things like, location, types of items being inspected, action items that may be gathered, team members working on the inspection, general notes that may be gathered.

  • 3. Make The Forms Easy To Fill Out

Some users may be using a phone, tablet or laptop in order to complete an inspection. Users will have varying skills when it comes to typing. As a best-practice, use as many auto-suggest and drop down fields as possible.

Other ways to make forms easy to fill out include having pre-populated fields, yes/no options, and multi-select fields. The Checker Software comes will all of the features built-in to make your life easier.

  • 4. Complete The Forms Yourself

It may go without saying but we have seen many times where someone builds a form inside their own box, only to find out it doesn’t work in the field. Make sure to complete inspections with your forms in order to ensure they don’t go awry.

  • 5. Don’t Do It Alone

Similar to number 4, many safety professionals end up in a scenario when an Audit or Inspection gets built in a bubble where no other departments have been consulted. This ends up in a pattern of iterative forms being created and the lack of being able to produce quality reporting.

Make sure to gather stakeholders from any departments who may need information from these Audits/Inspections. This may cause an initial delay in getting your inspection process started but will prevent future delays once the inspections begin.

Takeaway

Your inspection program is a huge key to the success or your business. Don’t take it for granted. Take the time to plan out your forms to make sure both workers and management get the most of out the data that is gathered.


If you think you may need help in planning out how to build your inspection checklist, we’re here for you! Contact us today to see what The Checker Software can do for you.

Topics: why inspect?, safety management, safety awareness, workplace safety, audit software

A Guide To Your Facility Walkthrough

Posted by Shawn Macpherson on Mon, Oct 22, 2018 @ 04:51 PM

 

facility walkthrough

The importance of a facility walkthrough is often regarded as something businesses, and employees should do on an optional basis, making it seem far less significant than it is. It’s important to understand the difference between a walkthrough, an inspection and an audit. Although the definition varies slightly by company, here are some general explanations of the terms:

  • Audit - a structured process whereby information is collected relating to the efficiency, effectiveness, and reliability of a company's total health and safety management system
  • Inspection - a formalized and properly documented process of identifying hazards in the workplace.
  • Walkthrough/walkaround - a worker or supervisor observing work taking place, inspecting the workplace, and discussing the safe performance of work with staff. The focus of a walkthrough should be positive, building team work and safety awareness rather than simply pointing out problems.

A walkthrough, also known as a walkaround or walkaround observation, allows businesses and their employees to understand better the work environment, its surroundings and the risks they are exposed to if not carefully instructed about how the work areas should be handled.

With The Checker Software, you can easily document everything from your walkthrough using our Observation Reporter feature. It’s simple, quick and will help you retain all of the information gathered during your walkthrough.

In most situations, when starting a walkthrough, you should always take into account the following steps:

Do a Pre-Inspection

While sometimes a pre-inspection may seem like going a little too far, it is necessary to make everybody understand what they should do when they find themselves in a particular area of the working facility.

This step is similar to a training exercise where the worker is taught what the focus should be on what, how and why the walkthrough is held. It's the step where everybody learns the concept and gets familiar with the working environment.

People get the chance to talk with one another and to listen to safety specialists on what the best practices of the specific field are and how they can better acknowledge them.

The Walkthrough Tour

When starting the walkthrough of the facility, be sure to limit the size of walkthrough groups. A limited number of people is more efficient when it comes to taking the tour. More often than not a single person may conduct the walkthrough on their own depending on the size of the facility.

In larger groups, people tend to lose their focus and get bored faster, due to the long waiting periods and the slow movement flow throughout the entire facility. Remember, less is more!

Point Out the Importance of the Facility

After finishing the walkthrough, be sure to emphasize the role this tour plays for the safety of each employee while entering the facility. Make oral bullet points (you can even ask people to write them down) about the key findings and elements that people have learned during the walkthrough.

Be sure to answer all the questions and offer all the necessary details required by each walkthrough participant. Information is King!

Draw Conclusions 

As the last step of a successful walkthrough, you will need to draw crystal clear conclusions that everyone will understand and remember. Ask the right questions and try to help everybody in finding the correct answers if they can't come up with it straight away.

Make the most important elements of the walkthrough stand out by starting short scrum sessions about them so they will stick in people's minds. 

Takeaway

By following these guidelines regarding the importance of the walkthrough, you will easily help people understand where the focus should be placed and what information is most important when conducting a walkthrough

If you're interested in learning more about using The Checker Software for walkthroughs, be sure to contact us, right here, or drop us a line with your questions on our official website.

Topics: why inspect?, safety management, safety awareness, workplace safety, audit software

Private vs. Public institutions - Why is there a double standard?

Posted by Shawn Macpherson on Mon, Oct 15, 2018 @ 01:00 PM

 

private vs. public

The eternal public vs. private sector debate has (for a long time actually) reached safety standards issues. Why do you ask? The answer is simple. The discussion starts off based on the premises that the private sector and private institutions in general, are not held to the same high standard municipalities (the public sector) are. So why is that?

Most of the times, private businesses are allowed to cut corners, or regulatory organizations look the other way when it comes to safety standards for their employees, for their buildings and the entire workplace in general.

On the other hand, when it comes to the public sector, municipalities are highly standardized, and there's no taking the easy road here. And nor should it be. When it comes to the safety of your employees, private or public, it does not matter. Safety is (or at least it should be!) universal for everybody, no matter the sector of work.

 

Transparency is important for municipalities

Municipalities are held to the highest possible standard and often scrutinized to ensure they are keeping their employees and facilities safe. However, this is not the case with the private sector, where it seems like the norms are looser. 

When dealing with the public, transparency is mandatory, because every contributor has the right to know where their tax dollars are going. But why shouldn’t private entities be as transparent as governmental institutions when it comes to the safety sector?

Shouldn't these numbers be available to everybody? Shouldn't all employees have access to see how much their employer is investing in the safety of the company's employees? 

We think that this is the way of the future because everybody deserves to work in a safe environment which is being checked out on a regular basis to make sure that all the latest safety standards are being implemented.

 

The public sector is one of the largest purchasers of The Checker books

Why is it that a large portion of our customers come from the public sector when the global tendency is to shift to the private sector? It means that although more and more private companies are being founded and starting activities that should be inspected, the number when it comes to implementing safety standards is not growing at the same pace.

 

Takeaway

Here, at The Checker, we offer professional services for both private and public entities, making our book the easiest to use, the most accurate and complete material on the subject available on the market.

We have been providing The Checker Checklist Books since 2000, contributing to more over 20 million successful inspections. If you're interested in taking your company to the latest safety standards in your field, or if you want to ask us for more details regarding our services, be sure to visit our official website, right here.

Topics: why inspect?, safety management, safety awareness, workplace safety, audit software