The Checker Blog

The Relationship Between Compensation and Safety Adherence

Posted by Shawn Macpherson on Tue, Apr 02, 2019 @ 07:15 AM

 

Finding a way to relate personnel's compliance to safety policies is an effective way to encourage workplace safety.

Safety in the workplace is an essential aspect of any organization. But in the hopes of saving money, some business owners feel tempted to not follow government safety regulations, such as those from the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) or the Ontario Ministry of Labour

This approach is short-sighted at best, since compliance with these safety policies will not only help safeguard against costly accidents, injuries, and property damages, it can avoid significant fines and, in some cases, even criminal charges,

It's also important to remember that in addition to the initial costs of an accident (fines, legal fees, civil claims, etc.), a company will also have to deal with indirect costs, which are usually several times more than the direct costs and can sometimes be more than 10 times higher.

But no matter how dedicated a business owner is to complying with safety regulations, if the company’s employees aren't willing or able to follow them, all of management's efforts will be in vain. In the end, it's the employees who are at the frontlines, making them an integral part of the day-to-day application of any safety policies. 

Some employees may be oblivious of the risks they subject themselves to by not following safety protocols, while others may disregard them so they can finish their work faster. Whatever the case, any employer needs to find ways to incentivize personnel to follow safety procedures and stay in line with regulatory standards.

Compensation for Safety Adherence

Of course, one of the most efficient ways of incentivizing personnel is to include safety adherence in decisions about how much to monetarily compensate an employee. A safety-adherence compensation program can be tailored to any company's structure and way of doing things, but regardless of the company’s unique needs,  personnel should be rewarded for good behaviour as well as a smooth and streamlined execution of specific safety protocols.  

The Checker Software is the perfect tool to implement such a program. It has numerous features, including the tracking and management of safety activities. If your employees are using The Checker Software during their daily safety inspections, the software will generate reports, telling you about their actions and how well they adhered to safety policies and procedures. 

The software allows for personal reminders, alerts, and notifications—ensuring that every safety check is carried out at the right time. 

Nothing will slip through the cracks or go unnoticed, allowing you to implement your safety-adherence compensation program to great effect. In addition, The Checker Software will enable personnel to detect and report potential risk hazards. You can incentivize them to do so, making them go one step beyond and become proactive in increasing workplace safety.

Takeaway

Companies have many reasons—and ways—to encourage employee compliance with safety policies and procedures that adhere to regulatory standards. Including safety compliance in compensation decisions is one of the best methods for this encouragement. The Checker Software enables management to easily track this compliance.

For more information about The Checker Pro, please visit our website or email us at info@thechecker.net.

 

Topics: safety management, OSHA, inspection management, inspections and profitability, risk assessments, safety audits, audit software, audit/inspection software

How Are Investments in Safety Similar to Infrastructure Spending?

Posted by Shawn Macpherson on Mon, Mar 25, 2019 @ 07:00 AM

safety like infrastructure

Executives, managers, supervisors, and other individuals in leadership positions sometimes put safety procedures and protocols in the last place in order to expedite projects. Some even go as far as disregarding it completely. Why?

Generally, it all has to do with their bottom line. Many people in leadership are concerned about profits first and everything else second. While this method of operating a business may generate some short-term benefits, it will prove to be a total disaster down the line.

The Infrastructure Analogy

To understand why this is, it’s illustrative to look at safety in the workplace in the same way as maintaining a country's infrastructure, which is generally comprised of public (and sometimes private) physical improvements such as roads, bridges, tunnels, railroads, sewers, water supply, power plants, electrical grids, telecommunications, etc.

In a business setting, “infrastructure” is composed of a company’s vehicles, equipment, and other assets. It's safe to say that a business cannot function without these things, just as a country's economy will not thrive without a well-established infrastructure.

But as most of us know, the infrastructure itself isn't enough for a country to run smoothly. That infrastructure also needs to be maintained. The problem is that the benefits of this maintenance usually aren't clearly visible. By definition, maintenance is essentially ensuring that things remain the same.

That’s why lawmakers often avoid these infrastructure investment, realizing that the public will not be aware of its effects and will not give them credit for it. It's only when a car-packed bridge collapses or a river dam bursts that the importance of infrastructure maintenance becomes apparent.

The same thing happens with safety in the workplace. Business leaders are more interested in profits and expediting projects (visible effects) than prioritizing safety in the workplace (maintenance).

Both infrastructure and safety are too often seen as a given, and only after severe damage is done, will they be given any attention.

Streamlining Safety

To counteract this problem, the best approach is to streamline safety procedures and make them as unobtrusive as possible in the day-to-day operations of your business. For this purpose, The Checker Software is highly effective— designed to optimize safety audits and inspections without any disruption to the business. This cloud-based software can be used on any device with an internet connection, streamlining safety procedures even further.

The Checker Software makes use of an extensive library of hundreds of ready-to-use checklists for a large variety of vehicles, equipment, and other assets. Checklists can also be easily customized to fit every organization's unique needs.

The Checker Software sends out personal reminders, notifications, and alerts, red-flagging any non-compliance issues and ensuring that nothing will slip between the cracks. It will also automatically compile safety reports, sending them to designated recipients (maintenance, management, safety personnel, customers, etc.).

And thanks to the software's analytics and archiving capabilities, users can analyze data, spot developing trends, gain business insights, and maintain a historical record of all inspection and audit activity. 

Takeaway

Just like maintaining national infrastructure, a company’s safety efforts may not be “sexy.” But safety is essential to the long-term well-being of a company, and The Checker Software is a powerful tool in being as safe as possible.

Topics: safety management, safety awareness, inspection software, equipment maintenance, vehicle safety, equipment safety, safety audits, audit software, audit/inspection software

Checklists: A Universal Tool in Life

Posted by Shawn Macpherson on Wed, Feb 27, 2019 @ 03:05 PM

Checklists make any job, project, or event be completed more correctly and smoothly.

Many people look at checklists as something tedious and boring. But when we use them, we quickly come to realize their efficiency.

Why? Because, as human beings, we tend to forget things. 

That’s particularly true when doing something that involves multiple steps. By using checklists, we ensure we won’t forget anything. And in addition to making sure we get things right, lists help in other ways.

For starters, a checklist will save you a lot of time. You no longer must remember every step or item on the list, so you can devote your full attention to the task at hand, as well as use your brainpower to be more productive and creative  in whatever you're doing. 

Second, you can delegate your tasks more comfortably with the use of a checklist. You can simply hand your list to the person to whom you’re assigning the responsibility, and they’ll understand what they have to do and how that fits with other steps in the checklist.

Very importantly, checklists also provide accountability for every stage of a job, project, or event. You know who’s done what.

Common Types of Everyday Checklists

Personal checklists

These checklists can take on many shapes and sizes. Grocery lists, cleaning lists, getting-ready-for-vacation lists—these checklists and others like them always come in handy. They're extremely useful in getting things done and keeping organized daily.

Project-based Checklists

Checklists are a great tool to keep you on track with a project. They help teams and individuals stay on track and finish every step promptly. They ensure that nothing slips through the cracks, that nothing is swept under the rug, and that everyone involved is accountable. 

Priority Checklists

Like their name suggests, priority checklists prioritize the tasks within them. They work by providing users with the overall picture, but also with what elements require preference over the others based on a scoring system.

The Importance of Safety Checklists

As far as safety is concerned, regular inspections are a must. If NOT done regularly and adequately, accidents are only a matter of time. Some of the biggest disasters of the past decade could have been averted if proper and comprehensive safety inspections were carried out. 

With The Checker Software, you can use a mobile device such as a tablet or smartphone and determine what needs checking—and how to best do it. These checklists can be accessed from any internet-connected device and, once completed, they can be submitted to automatically generate corrective actions, prove compliance, and analyze patterns.

Nothing will go unnoticed; everyone will be held accountable, potential hazards will be immediately identified, and the risk of an accident will be significantly diminished.

Takeaway

Checklists come in many forms and are used for countless purposes in everyday life. In business, checklists are a tool to improve safety, compliance, productivity, and profitability.

Topics: safety management, inspection checklists, audit software, audit/inspection software

No Reason to Fear Safety Non-compliance

Posted by Shawn Macpherson on Thu, Feb 21, 2019 @ 07:30 AM

Companies within the United States that do not follow the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulations are opening themselves up to all sorts of non-compliance fines.

In the developed world, most countries have similar regulations. These regulations are straightforward, and the cost of non-compliance is clear. 

Types of OSHA Violations

De Minimis – This is the least severe type of violation, with no real impact on health or safety. OSHA does not issue fines for these kinds of breaches

Other-than-serious  This is an offence that is related to health or safety but would not directly result in severe injury or death. One such example is the failure to post required safety documentation in the work area. Substantial fines result.

Serious These types of violations are issued when an employer is aware of a potential hazard that poses a health or safety risk to the employees but does nothing about it. Substantial fines result.

Willful – This level of violation is issued when there’s an intentional violation of OSHA standards. If it results in an employee killed, there’s possible jail time in addition to fines.

Failure to Abate Companies have a set amount of time to fix problems they were cited. If they fail to do so in that time, fines accrue and criminal charges are likely.

Indirect Costs Associated with Non-Compliance Violations

Aside from fines and criminal liability, employers also have to face the legal costs to settle civil claims, as well as business disruption and negative reputation costs.

According to a survey conducted by the American Society of Safety Engineers (ASSE), every dollar spent on direct costs and fines related to an accident results in an additional $3-$10 in indirect costs. 

A Comprehensive Inspection Program

Fortunately, these risks can be minimized.

A well-thought-out, comprehensive safety inspection program, implemented using The Checker Software, will increase a company's worker safety and comply with all mandatory regulations. 

This software—which can be used on any mobile device—can manage inspections and audits, identify hazards, and provide corrective and preventive actions. It can relieve you of any anxiety about non-compliance and pave the way to a safe workplace.

Topics: safety management, OSHA, legal compliance, inspection software, inspection management, audit/inspection software

Three Historical Disasters Due to Inspection Failure

Posted by Shawn Macpherson on Thu, Feb 14, 2019 @ 02:10 PM

It pays to look for problems that could led to workplace disasters.

Things don't always go as planned. Accidents are an all-too-common occurrence that can negatively impact businesses of all types and sizes.

Safety inspections can prevent these accidents from happening!

Nonetheless, many business owners prefer to risk cutting corners, hoping to save some time and money in the process. This is a slippery slope that often leads to disaster.

Consider these infamous examples:

The 2018 New York Limo Crash

In October 2018, a stretch limousine plowed through an intersection in upstate New York. Twenty people were killed—17 passengers, two pedestrians, and the driver. This accident is considered to be the deadliest U.S. transportation disaster since 2009, and it made headlines across the world.

The police investigation found that the limo failed a safety inspection earlier that month. (The driver also didn't have the right license to drive it.) 

The 2017 Grenfell Tower Fire in London

On June 14, 2017, a fire broke out at around 1 a.m. in a 24-story apartment block in West London known as the Grenfell Tower. The fire raged for 24 hours, but it took over 60 hours to fully extinguish it. Seventy people died in the fire, and another two victims died at the hospital. Another 70 people were injured.

With material damages estimated at between 200 million and one billion pounds, the Grenfell Tower is the deadliest structural fire in the United Kingdom since 1988 and the worst residential fire in the U.K. since World War II. 

The building underwent significant exterior renovations in 2015-16, including rain-screen cladding that later proved to be highly flammable. Both residents and an official report mentioned safety concerns about the building—before the fire.

To make matters worse, the first fire brigade incident commander admitted he failed to make numerous safety checks before the disaster, stating that he didn't know fire could spread through the cladding. 

The 2010 Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

Also known as the BP oil disaster, the Deepwater Horizon oil spill—which began with an explosion on April 20, 2010, in the Gulf of Mexico—is considered to be the largest marine oil spill in history. Even after two years of being declared sealed on September 19, 2010, reports indicated that oil was still leaking. Eleven people died and 17 were severely injured in the accident. Countless people along the Gulf's U.S. coast were negatively affected.

An investigation by the U.S. Chemical Safety Board (CSB) revealed that Deepwater Horizon personnel did perform regular inspections on components necessary for day-to-day drilling operations. But they didn’t conduct regular checks on the emergency systems used to identify latent failures. If they had, the disaster likely could have been avoided. 

Takeaway

Proper, regular safety inspections could have prevented these three disasters, and they can keep similar tragedies from happening in your organization.

Topics: safety management, safety awareness, workplace safety, inspection management

How to Make a Comprehensive Safety Program Work

Posted by Shawn Macpherson on Fri, Jan 11, 2019 @ 01:30 PM

A comprehensive safety program with regular inspections can keep personnel safe and provide many ancillary benefits.

When talking about workplace safety, most businesses think they’re at least above average. But if they were to look at the details and how equipment operates in the field on a day-to-day basis, the reality may prove to be somewhat different

Most managers are aware that safety programs help minimize work-related injuries or sudden equipment failures, as well as the inherent costs that come attached to these issues. But some are still unaware of the short-term, bottom-line benefits of safety. 

Workers may be inclined to skip on safety procedures so they can finish their work faster. Some managers may turn a blind eye to this because it's easy to take safety for granted when accidents aren't happening.

If work-related accidents (even small ones) are a fairly common occurrence, or the equipment tends to break unexpectedly, you need a comprehensive safety program. 

Key Components of a Comprehensive Safety Program

Regular safety inspections and audits

The foundation of every safety program lies with regular inspections and audits. These forms of data collection help companies detect any problems before they can result in an accident or malfunction.

Inspection tools

Personnel need to be supplied with the resources to conduct audits and inspections accurately and efficiently. For example, The Checker Software allows safety inspectors to identify trends or problems that may require additional safety measures. 

Training

Regular safety audits and inspections will bring to light any unsafe activity by personnel. You can use this information for training purposes, focusing on areas that may need improvement. 

Additional Benefits of Safety

Maintenance

Analyzing audit and inspection data will reveal long-term patterns about the likelihood of when assets will break down. You can use this information to predict wear and develop preventive maintenance strategies to counteract the issues. 

Business Processes

Audits and inspections will also point to issues causing assets to fail prematurely. For example, if a piece of equipment breaks down every time within the next month after using it for a specific operation, it's safe to conclude that personnel might be using that equipment wrong when performing that function. There could, of course, be other causes of the problem but at least you were made aware of the correlation. 

Takeaway

There isn't a one-size-fits-all approach to a comprehensive safety program. Each company needs to develop its program based on its individual needs. But in every case, a tool such as The Checker Software can serve as the foundation for your safety program. For more information, contact us directly.

Topics: safety management, workplace safety, inspection software, equipment maintenance, safety audits, audit/inspection software

Five Ways to Make Your Workplace Safer

Posted by Shawn Macpherson on Thu, Dec 27, 2018 @ 08:30 AM

really good resuable with books with titles

Never undervalue workplace safety. A proactive approach to safety has many benefits and many risks and liabilities if you don't. A safety mindset can increase production, reduce costs, lower the risk of accidents, boost morale, and streamline operations. On the other side, however, if you decide to forsake workplace safety in favor of short-term profits, you may end up losing both.   

These five elements of a safe work environment are easily achievable by both big and small business.

Employee Training

Safety policies and procedures aren’t enough to ensure a safe workspace. The employer alone can’t guarantee workplace safety. Everyone in the organization should be trained in the importance of safety and their role in maintaining a safe workplace.

Nobody wants to get hurt or see their colleagues get hurt. But people generally have the impression that work-related accidents only happen in other places, to other people. This thinking leads to complacency, and that's precisely when accidents happen. Good training can  impart the safety attitude necessary to guard against this complacency.

Safety in Stages

Workplace safety almost always happens in stages. Usually employers originate the idea of protection. It’s what's known as the adoption stage. Once ownership and management have adopted a safety mindset, that mindset will spread throughout the company. but too often employees are acting safely simply because they’re instructed to.  what they're instructed to. This stage can’t go on indefinitely.

Next comes the engagement stage, when everyone genuinely buys in. It becomes part of the culture—let’s keep each other safe.

Available Resources

It costs money to implement and uphold safety. That’s the exact reason why some businesses decide to cut corners or renounce on safety altogether. Nevertheless, by doing so, all of these businesses—by not investing in safety—inevitably end up paying more in the long term than what they managed to save in the short term.

Smart organizations provide the resources to be safe.

Effective Response to Reported Hazards

Hazards in the workplace range from seemingly simple hazards (poor housekeeping, working in confined spaces, etc.) up to dangerous chemicals, exposed electrical wiring, and other such extremely dangerous (potentially fatal) issues.

Even if identified, most of these hazards go unfixed over prolonged periods, making them increasingly dangerous. That’s why you need audit/inspection software such as The Checker Software, which instantly emails action items to the people who need to be involved in remedying the hazard.

Leadership by Example

The workplace won’t be safe if the organization’s leaders “talk the talk but don’t walk the walk.”  It’s not wearing a hardhat while touring a site. It’s budgeting and effectively incentivizing. It’s truly valuing safety.

When leaders make it clear that safety matters immensely—and they back it up with action and budget funding—the cost-saving, life-saving benefits of investments in safety are fully realized.

Takeaway

Get on the right track of developing a safety-oriented culture where everyone stands to gain. For more information on how to increase the safety of your business, visit our website or contact us directly. 

Topics: safety management, safety awareness, workplace safety, safety audits, audit/inspection software

5 Inspection Books You Didn't Know Existed

Posted by Shawn Macpherson on Mon, Nov 19, 2018 @ 10:24 AM

 

5 inspection books you didn't know

Inspection books are in high demand. Accurate and regular inspection of your equipment is critical in keeping your workplace safe, maintain compliance, and improve productivity. Most employees would agree that preventing these accidents should be a natural priority for any business. Safety irregularities are never intentional, but they do come about when companies try to cut corners and don't take the time to adequately train their staff on the importance of safety and safety protocols. 

And it's important to remember that, in the event of an accident, it's not only the employee who has to suffer and pay. According to the Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OHSA), "employers pay almost $1 billion per week for direct workers' compensation costs alone." Likewise, it's important to remember that the gap in coverage of an underinsured employer is still the responsibility of the employer and they will have to continue paying employees who miss work as a result of a workplace injury. 

It should also go without saying that proper inspections, or a lack thereof, can affect your business in other ways. For starters, fewer workplace accidents mean higher or steady productivity, whereas a single mishap can result in a steep drop in company-wide morale. Then there's the negative public perception in the event of one such accident, not to mention the legal liabilities that will follow.  

 

The New York Limo Crash

In early October 2018, a stretch limo carrying 17 people in upstate New York resulted in a deadly crash with all the passengers, driver, and two pedestrians killed. With a total death toll of 20, this incident is the deadliest US transportation accident since 2009 and made headlines around the nation. 

On closer examination of the crash site, it revealed that the driver never hit the brakes, plowing straight through a T-intersection. Also, the driver didn't have the appropriate license to drive that particular vehicle, while the limo failed an inspection only the month prior. 

The 5 Inspection Books

And while the investigation of the accident is still ongoing, with the authorities looking into all the activities and regulations of the limo-renting business, the takeaway could not be more apparent - proper and regular safety inspections are mandatory. To ensure that these inspections are done correctly, you will need the right inspection books. Below are five such inspection books that you may not know existed. 

Passenger Transportation Vehicles - It is for all applications, operations, and industries such as public transit, school, hospital, tourism, airport shuttle, limos, carriers, rentals, and all other enterprises that involve passenger transport.  

Railcar MoverThis inspection book applies to all mobile railcar movers, regardless of industry (construction, mining, forestry, industrial, warehousing, etc.) It also applies to all models, makes, manufacturers, sizes, etc.

Battery Charging Areas - Applies to the inspection and use of a battery and equipment such as charging, inspection, changing, maintenance, filling cells, production, models, sizes, voltage, etc. 

Wood Chippers - Available for inspection, operation, and use of all brush and wood chipper equipment in all industrial applications, regardless of make, manufacturer, size, brands, etc. 

Chainsaw - Applies to all chainsaw equipment in all industry applications such as firefighters, emergency responders, construction, forestry, landscaping, grounds keeping, etc. It also covers all areas such as the chain, saw bar, engine, controls, startup, PPE, and it applies to all brands, models, sizes, and fuel types.  

The Checker has been providing its Checklist Books since 2000, contributing to more over 20 million successful inspections. If you're interested in your company following the latest safety standards in your field and industry, or if you want to ask us for more details regarding our services, be sure to visit our official website, right here.

Topics: why inspect?, safety management, inspection checklists, workplace safety, inspections and profitability, inspection forms

5 steps to a well designed checklist

Posted by Shawn Macpherson on Mon, Nov 05, 2018 @ 09:09 AM

 

5 steps picture

No one wants to do extra work. You’ve probably seen it in your own workplace. Employees and Managers alike will always try to get the job done as quickly as possible. This is no different when it come to using The Checker Software for creating your custom Audit and Inspection forms.

Although having the flexibility to put whatever you want into your inspection form is an amazing feature, it can also be your greatest downfall. Here are 5 steps to follow when building out your inspection form:

  • 1. Add As Few Fields As Possible

This may sound counter-intuitive but research shows that the less fields you have on a form, the more likely a user is to complete the form. Inspections often require a lot of information to be gathered in order to remain compliant with specific regulations. Because of this, adding additional fields may make matters worse.

When considering adding new fields to a form ask yourself this question, “What will I use the data for?” If you can’t quickly answer which report this data will be used for or which governing body you will pass along this information to, take that field out of your form.

  • 2. Fields Should Be Organized Based On Your Process

If you’ve ever filled out information on a form only to go back and forth between pages in order to review notes or look at previously entered information, than you understand the value of this best-practice.

When planning out your Audit or Inspection form, make sure to consider each location and the method that is used by the Auditor/Inspector to complete the inspection. Consider things like, location, types of items being inspected, action items that may be gathered, team members working on the inspection, general notes that may be gathered.

  • 3. Make The Forms Easy To Fill Out

Some users may be using a phone, tablet or laptop in order to complete an inspection. Users will have varying skills when it comes to typing. As a best-practice, use as many auto-suggest and drop down fields as possible.

Other ways to make forms easy to fill out include having pre-populated fields, yes/no options, and multi-select fields. The Checker Software comes will all of the features built-in to make your life easier.

  • 4. Complete The Forms Yourself

It may go without saying but we have seen many times where someone builds a form inside their own box, only to find out it doesn’t work in the field. Make sure to complete inspections with your forms in order to ensure they don’t go awry.

  • 5. Don’t Do It Alone

Similar to number 4, many safety professionals end up in a scenario when an Audit or Inspection gets built in a bubble where no other departments have been consulted. This ends up in a pattern of iterative forms being created and the lack of being able to produce quality reporting.

Make sure to gather stakeholders from any departments who may need information from these Audits/Inspections. This may cause an initial delay in getting your inspection process started but will prevent future delays once the inspections begin.

Takeaway

Your inspection program is a huge key to the success or your business. Don’t take it for granted. Take the time to plan out your forms to make sure both workers and management get the most of out the data that is gathered.


If you think you may need help in planning out how to build your inspection checklist, we’re here for you! Contact us today to see what The Checker Software can do for you.

Topics: why inspect?, safety management, safety awareness, workplace safety, audit software

A Guide To Your Facility Walkthrough

Posted by Shawn Macpherson on Mon, Oct 22, 2018 @ 04:51 PM

 

facility walkthrough

The importance of a facility walkthrough is often regarded as something businesses, and employees should do on an optional basis, making it seem far less significant than it is. It’s important to understand the difference between a walkthrough, an inspection and an audit. Although the definition varies slightly by company, here are some general explanations of the terms:

  • Audit - a structured process whereby information is collected relating to the efficiency, effectiveness, and reliability of a company's total health and safety management system
  • Inspection - a formalized and properly documented process of identifying hazards in the workplace.
  • Walkthrough/walkaround - a worker or supervisor observing work taking place, inspecting the workplace, and discussing the safe performance of work with staff. The focus of a walkthrough should be positive, building team work and safety awareness rather than simply pointing out problems.

A walkthrough, also known as a walkaround or walkaround observation, allows businesses and their employees to understand better the work environment, its surroundings and the risks they are exposed to if not carefully instructed about how the work areas should be handled.

With The Checker Software, you can easily document everything from your walkthrough using our Observation Reporter feature. It’s simple, quick and will help you retain all of the information gathered during your walkthrough.

In most situations, when starting a walkthrough, you should always take into account the following steps:

Do a Pre-Inspection

While sometimes a pre-inspection may seem like going a little too far, it is necessary to make everybody understand what they should do when they find themselves in a particular area of the working facility.

This step is similar to a training exercise where the worker is taught what the focus should be on what, how and why the walkthrough is held. It's the step where everybody learns the concept and gets familiar with the working environment.

People get the chance to talk with one another and to listen to safety specialists on what the best practices of the specific field are and how they can better acknowledge them.

The Walkthrough Tour

When starting the walkthrough of the facility, be sure to limit the size of walkthrough groups. A limited number of people is more efficient when it comes to taking the tour. More often than not a single person may conduct the walkthrough on their own depending on the size of the facility.

In larger groups, people tend to lose their focus and get bored faster, due to the long waiting periods and the slow movement flow throughout the entire facility. Remember, less is more!

Point Out the Importance of the Facility

After finishing the walkthrough, be sure to emphasize the role this tour plays for the safety of each employee while entering the facility. Make oral bullet points (you can even ask people to write them down) about the key findings and elements that people have learned during the walkthrough.

Be sure to answer all the questions and offer all the necessary details required by each walkthrough participant. Information is King!

Draw Conclusions 

As the last step of a successful walkthrough, you will need to draw crystal clear conclusions that everyone will understand and remember. Ask the right questions and try to help everybody in finding the correct answers if they can't come up with it straight away.

Make the most important elements of the walkthrough stand out by starting short scrum sessions about them so they will stick in people's minds. 

Takeaway

By following these guidelines regarding the importance of the walkthrough, you will easily help people understand where the focus should be placed and what information is most important when conducting a walkthrough

If you're interested in learning more about using The Checker Software for walkthroughs, be sure to contact us, right here, or drop us a line with your questions on our official website.

Topics: why inspect?, safety management, safety awareness, workplace safety, audit software